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   2011, Vol. 19 Issue (7) : 1061-1068     DOI:
研究前沿 |
Outgroup Favoritism among the Members of Low-Status Groups
LI Qiong;LIU Li
School of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing Key Lab for Applied Experimental Psychology, Beijing 100875, China
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Abstract  Ingroup favoritism is common in intergroup relationship. However, recent studies have found that the members of low-status groups may show outgroup favoritism. Social identity theory, social dominance theory and system justification theory elucidate the outgroup favoritism among the members of low-status groups from different perspectives. Social identity theory focuses on the effect of context, and it demonstrates the conditions in which outgroup favoritism emerges. Social dominance theory explains the phenomenon in terms of social dominance orientation. It is social dominance orientation that affects disadvantaged groups’ choice between rebellion and acceptance of the social status quo. System justification theory suggests that system justification motive impulses the members of low-status groups to support the existing social order in opposition to their interests. Each of these theories has both its strength and its weakness. Thus it is reasonable to integrate the ideas from these theories. It is argued that there is an interaction between social identity and social dominance orientation in explaining outgroup favoritism among the members of low-status groups.
Keywords outgroup favoritism, consensual discrimination, social dominance orientation, system justification motive     
Corresponding Authors: LIU Li   
Issue Date: 15 July 2011
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LI Qiong,LIU Li. Outgroup Favoritism among the Members of Low-Status Groups[J]. , 2011, 19(7): 1061-1068.
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http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/     OR     http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/Y2011/V19/I7/1061
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