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   2011, Vol. 19 Issue (6) : 916-924     DOI:
研究前沿 |
From “Chameleon effect” to “Mirror Neurons” and to “Echopraxia”: Human Mimicry Comes from Social Interaction
WANG Yin;ZANG Yin-Yin;CHEN Wei
(1 School of Psychology, the University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD, UK)
(2 Institute of Work, Health and Organisations, the University of Nottingham, NG8 1BB, UK)
(3 Department of Psychology, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097, China)
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Abstract  Mimicry refers to the unconscious imitation of other people’s behavior. It facilitates social interaction and plays a key role in one’s cognitive and social development. Converging evidences in cognitive neuroscience reveal that the neural mechanism of mimicry is based on mirror neuron system. Neuropsychological research suggests that clinical mimicry disorders such as echopraxia arise from the dysfunctional control of this system. As both the formation of mirror neurons and the control of mimicry are crucially driven by social interaction, here it is concluded that human mimicry is the product of social interaction. This point of view helps us better understand the ontogeny of mimicry in both neural and behavioral level and sheds light on the practical approaches to improve infant’s social and cognitive development. Finally, implications for the research of autism are discussed.
Keywords human mimicry      chameleon effect      mirror neurons      associative learning theory      echopraxia      social interaction      autism     
Corresponding Authors: CHEN Wei   
Issue Date: 15 June 2011
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WANG Yin,ZANG Yin-Yin,CHEN Wei. From “Chameleon effect” to “Mirror Neurons” and to “Echopraxia”: Human Mimicry Comes from Social Interaction[J]. , 2011, 19(6): 916-924.
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http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/     OR     http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/Y2011/V19/I6/916
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