Please wait a minute...
Advances in Psychological Science    2016, Vol. 24 Issue (1) : 21-30     DOI: 10.3724/SP.J.1042.2016.00021
Regular Articles |
The differences between silent and oral reading
GAO Min; XU Erjia; REN Guiqin; SUI Xue
(School of Psychological Science, Liaoning Normal University; Collaborative Innovation Center for Healthy Personality Assessment and Training of Children and Adolescents, Dalian 116029, China)
Download: PDF(422 KB)  
Export: BibTeX | EndNote | Reference Manager | ProCite | RefWorks    
Abstract  

Silent and oral reading are two basic reading models in reading research. In this study, we summarized the differences between silent and oral reading from the following three aspects. First, reading behaviors are different under silent and oral reading. Second, previous studies show that cognitive mechanisms are also different between silent and oral reading. Finally, silent and oral reading could lead to different brain arousing. In addition, we also give some suggestions about the future research. The future research should focus on the specific phase of transforming from oral to silent reading, eye movement differences in the development process of the two different reading modes, influences of the pronunciation and the background music on reading under the two different reading modes, the difference in children’s brain mechanism under the two different reading modes and so on.

Keywords reading mode      silent reading      oral reading     
Corresponding Authors: SUI Xue, E-mail: suixue88@163.com   
Issue Date: 15 January 2016
Service
E-mail this article
E-mail Alert
RSS
Articles by authors
GAO Min
XU Erjia
REN Guiqin
SUI Xue
Cite this article:   
GAO Min,XU Erjia,REN Guiqin, et al. The differences between silent and oral reading[J]. Advances in Psychological Science, 2016, 24(1): 21-30.
URL:  
http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/10.3724/SP.J.1042.2016.00021     OR     http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/Y2016/V24/I1/21
No related articles found!
Viewed
Full text


Abstract

Cited

  Shared   
  Discussed   
Copyright © Advances in Psychological Science
Support by Beijing Magtech