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Advances in Psychological Science    2013, Vol. 21 Issue (7) : 1186-1199     DOI: 10.3724/SP.J.1042.2013.01186
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The Effects of Emotional States on Executive Functioning
ZHOU Ya
(Department of Educational Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China)
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Abstract  The number of studies that concerned with the effect of emotional states on executive functioning has been constantly growing for the last decade. While negative emotions (particularly anxious and depressive state) have been demonstrated to impair the efficiency of executive functioning, the mechanisms by which positive emotions influence executive functioning remains unclear. The backward status of research into the effects of positive emotions may largely have its roots on the weakness of related theoretical assumptions. In view of this, two newly emerging theories on positive emotions were introduced, The Broaden and Build Theory of Positive Emotions and The Motivational Dimensional Model of Affect. They both brought forward some theoretical perspectives which may help us understand the possible effect of positive emotions on executive functioning.
Keywords negative/positive emotions      executive functioning      The Broaden and Build Theory of Positive Emotions      The Motivational Dimensional Model of Affect     
Corresponding Authors: ZHOU Ya   
Issue Date: 15 July 2013
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ZHOU Ya. The Effects of Emotional States on Executive Functioning[J]. Advances in Psychological Science, 2013, 21(7): 1186-1199.
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http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/10.3724/SP.J.1042.2013.01186     OR     http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/Y2013/V21/I7/1186
[1] Xu Fen,Zhang Wenjing,Wang Weixing. Relationship between Theory of Mind and Executive Functioning from the Perspective of Brain Research[J]. , 2004, 12(05): 723-728.
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