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Advances in Psychological Science    2015, Vol. 23 Issue (2) : 268-279     DOI: 10.3724/SP.J.1042.2015.00268
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The Short-term Fluctuation of Work Engagement
LU Xinxin1; TU Yidong2
(1 School of Labor and Human Resources, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872, China) (2 Economics and Management School, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China)
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Abstract  

As research focus is shifting from static to dynamic approach and from between-person difference to within-person variation, short-term fluctuation of work engagement has dominated the mainstream of the extant literature. Considering that few studies have tapped work engagement fluctuation in mainland China, we introduced the concept of state work engagement and identified theoretical and compositional sources of its fluctuation. Furthermore, this paper illustrated instrument to assess state work engagement, diary study and experience sampling for data collection, as well as Hierarchical Linear Modeling with repeated measurement for data analysis in fluctuation research. Based on the literature review concerning theories, relates and boundary conditions of the relevant relations, the present paper established research framework of state work engagement and summarized the patterns of its fluctuation.

Keywords state work engagement      short-term fluctuation      within-person perspective      research framework      Hierarchical Linear Modeling     
Corresponding Authors: TU Yidong, E-mail: ydtu@whu.edu.cn   
Issue Date: 14 February 2015
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LU Xinxin,TU Yidong. The Short-term Fluctuation of Work Engagement[J]. Advances in Psychological Science, 2015, 23(2): 268-279.
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http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/10.3724/SP.J.1042.2015.00268     OR     http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/Y2015/V23/I2/268
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