Please wait a minute...
Acta Psychologica Sinica
|
The Preview of Word N+2 Influences the High Frequency Word N+1 Processing in Chinese Reading
BAI Xuejun; WANG Yongsheng; GUO Zhiying; GAO Xiaolei; YAN Guoli
(Academy of Psychology and Behavior, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300074, China)
Download: PDF(372 KB)   Review File (1 KB) 
Export: BibTeX | EndNote | Reference Manager | ProCite | RefWorks    
Abstract  

Whether readers can obtain preview information from word N+2 in the parafovea is a key problem for solving the controversy of whether words in the perceptual span are processed in serial or in parallel. Several studies using the boundary paradigm have demonstrated that the preview of word N+2 influences fixations on word N+1 (Kliegl, 2007; Yan, 2010; Yang, 2009; Risse, 2012), but it has not been investigated what kind of preview information drives these effects. The present study used the boundary paradigm to explore the influence of the preview of word N+2 on the processing of word N+1 during Chinese reading. Three experiments are reported. In experiment 1, we manipulated the previews of a single character high-frequency word N+1 and the first character of word N+2. The results showed that fixation durations on word N+1 given an identity preview of word N+1 were significantly longer given an identity compared to non-word preview of word N+2. In experiment 2, we manipulated the previews of word N+1 and the first character of word N+2, and controlled the identity previews of both characters to be orthographically similar. We hypothesized that the orthographic information gained from the first character of word N+2 in the parafovea would affect the processing of word N+1. Our results showed no effect of the N+2 preview. However, due to the orthographically similar character N+2 being available during fixations on both words N and N+1 we were unable to determine if our effect was driven by it being processed far into the parafovea during fixations on word N, or closer to the fovea during fixations on word N+1. To address this possibility we conducted experiment 3. We used the same manipulation as in experiment 2, but ensured that the orthographic similarity between the two characters was only present during fixations on word N. In this experiment there was orthographic overlap between the identity preview of word N+1 and the false preview of word N+2. As such, the orthographic similarity was only present during fixations on word N, rather than both word N and word N+1.Our results showed that when the preview of word N+2 was orthographically similar to word N+1 as opposed to orthographically dissimilar, fixation durations on word N+1 were shorter. Overall, the results showed that the preprocessing of word N+2 significantly influenced the processing of word N+1. The results indicated that orthographic information from word N+2 had been preprocessed in the parafovea during fixations on word N, and that this overlapping information markedly affected the processing of word N+1, such that fixation times were shorter. Therefore, the present study demonstrates that words within the perceptual span can be processed in parallel.

Keywords Chinese reading      preview benefit      boundary paradigm      eye movements     
Corresponding Authors: BAI Xuejun, E-mail: bxuejun@126.com; WANG Yongsheng, E-mail: jinlongyongsheng@126.com    
Issue Date: 25 February 2015
Service
E-mail this article
E-mail Alert
RSS
Articles by authors
BAI Xuejun
WANG Yongsheng
GUO Zhiying
GAO Xiaolei
YAN Guoli
Cite this article:   
BAI Xuejun,WANG Yongsheng,GUO Zhiying, et al. The Preview of Word N+2 Influences the High Frequency Word N+1 Processing in Chinese Reading[J]. Acta Psychologica Sinica, 10.3724/SP.J.1041.2015.00143
URL:  
http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlxb/EN/10.3724/SP.J.1041.2015.00143     OR     http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlxb/EN/Y2015/V47/I2/143
[1] LIU Zhifang; ZHANG Zhijun; YANG Guifang. Test the activation model of transforming characters to words in Chinese reading: Evidence from delay word-boundary effects[J]. Acta Psychologica Sinica, 2016, 48(9): 1082-1092.
[2] SU Heng; LIU Zhifang; CAO Liren. The effects of word frequency and word predictability in preview and their implications for word segmentation in Chinese reading: Evidence from eye movements[J]. Acta Psychologica Sinica, 2016, 48(6): 625-636.
[3] WANG Fuxing; LI Wenjing; YAN Zhiqiang; DUAN Zhaohui; LI Hui. Children’s Attention Detection to Snakes: Evidence from Eye Movements[J]. Acta Psychologica Sinica, 2015, 47(6): 774-786.
[4] YAN Guoli; LIU Nina; LIANG Feifei; LIU Zhifang; BAI Xuejun. The Comparison of Eye Movements between Chinese Children and Adults When Reading Disappearing Text[J]. Acta Psychologica Sinica, 2015, 47(3): 300-318.
[5] WANG Fuxing; DUAN Zhaohui; ZHOU Zongkui; CHEN Jun. The Spatial Contiguity Effect in Multimedia Learning: The Role of Cueing[J]. Acta Psychologica Sinica, 2015, 47(2): 224-233.
[6] XU Baihua;LI Yuming;CUI Xiangyu. The Role of Surface Color Feature Cue in Object Persistence under Two Different Spatiotemporal Conditions[J]. Acta Psychologica Sinica, 2013, 45(6): 649-657.
[7] LIU Zhifang;YAN Guoli;ZHANG Zhijun;PAN Yun;YANG Guifang. Preview Benefits and Word Segmentations When Reading Chinese[J]. Acta Psychologica Sinica, 2013, 45(6): 614-625.
[8] WANG Qiandong;HU Chao;FU Genyue. An Eye-tracking Research on the Other Race Effect During Face Processing in Preschool Children[J]. Acta Psychologica Sinica, 2013, 45(2): 169-178.
[9] WANG Xiang-Bo,DAI Xiao-Dong,DING Jin-Hong. The Effect of Mass Representation and Oculomotor Overshoot on “Representational Momentum”[J]. , 2012, 44(7): 896-909.
[10] REN Gui-Qin,HAN Yu-Chang,YU Ze. The Activation of Orthography and Phonology During Chinese Sentence Reading: Evidence from Eye Movements[J]. , 2012, 44(4): 427-434.
[11] GAO Xiao,WANG Quan-Chuan,CHEN Hong,WANG Bao-Ying,ZHAO Guang. Time Course of Attentional Bias Components Toward Body-shape Related Pictures Among Women with Fat Negative Physical Self: An Eye Movement Study[J]. , 2012, 44(4): 498-510.
[12] QIU Li-Jing;WANG Sui-Ping;CHEN Hsuan-Chih. Pronoun Processing during Language Comprehension:The Effects of Distance and Gender Stereotype[J]. Acta Psychologica Sinica, 2012, 44(10): 1279-1288.
[13] ZHANG Zhi-Jun,LIU Zhi-Fang,ZHAO Ya-Jun,JI Jing. The Locations of Word Segmentation in Chinese Reading: Research Based on the Eye-Movement-Contingent Display Technique[J]. , 2012, 44(1): 51-62.
[14]

BAI Xue-Jun,GUO Zhi-Ying,GU Jun-Juan,CAO Yu-Xiao,YAN Guo-Li

. Effect of Word Segmentation Cues on Japanese-Chinese Bilingual’s Chinese Reading: Evidence from Eye Movements[J]. , 2011, 43(11): 1273-1282.
[15] LIU Zhi-Fang,ZHANG Zhi-Jun,ZHAO Ya-Jun. The Units Saccade Targeting Based on and Words Procession Style in Chinese Reading: Evidences from Disappearing Text[J]. , 2011, 43(06): 608-618.
Viewed
Full text


Abstract

Cited

  Shared   
  Discussed   
Copyright © Acta Psychologica Sinica
Support by Beijing Magtech