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Advances in Psychological Science    2019, Vol. 27 Issue (6) : 1085-1092     DOI: 10.3724/SP.J.1042.2019.01085
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The confrontational response of women to gender prejudice between two identities
CUI Jialei,CUI Liying()
Department of Psychology, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234, China
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Abstract  

Prejudice is the consequence of the interaction and joint construction of perpetrators, targets, and bystanders, rather than a unilateral social psychological phenomenon. As targets or bystanders, women’s responses to perpetrators are different or similar.We discuss Stress Coping and Confronting Prejudiced Responses Models that interpreting women's response to gender prejudice between two different identities. In particular, we analyzed the various influences of optimism, cost/benefit, distress and feminism on the confrontational response of women to prejudice while they are targets versus bystanders. Finally, we outline directions for future research and call for greater consideration on the controversy for the validity of confrontational responses, the intervention on perpetrators who hold an implicit gender prejudice and the substitution effect of expanded imagined contact.

Keywords prejudice      gender prejudice      bystander intervention      prejudice prevention      feminist activism     
ZTFLH:  B849:C91  
Corresponding Authors: Liying CUI     E-mail: cui720926@163.com
Issue Date: 22 April 2019
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Jialei CUI,Liying CUI. The confrontational response of women to gender prejudice between two identities[J]. Advances in Psychological Science, 2019, 27(6): 1085-1092.
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http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/10.3724/SP.J.1042.2019.01085     OR     http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/Y2019/V27/I6/1085
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