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Advances in Psychological Science    2017, Vol. 25 Issue (1) : 29-36     DOI: 10.3724/SP.J.1042.2017.00029
Research Methods |
Detection methods of microsaccades
ZHANG Yang; LI Aisu; ZHANG Shaojie; ZHANG Ming
(Department of Psychology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215000, China)
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Abstract  

Eye movement is one of the most fundamental skills for human being to explore the world around us. Microsaccades refer to the involuntarily fast and large eye movements during visual fixation of a stimulus. Over the past 15 years, microsaccades have gradually become one of the hottest fields of vision research. Investigation of microsaccades has relied heavily on successful detection and measurement of the microsaccades. Although during the past half century, microsaccades have received much attention in the fields of psychology, how to detect and measure it robustly and accurately is still an open question. The current paper reviewed the literatures on the algorithm of the microsaccades-detection procedures, and pointed out that the future studies could combine the objective threshold procedure with the multiple- indexes analysis to further optimize and improve the detection procedure of microsaccades.

Keywords detection of microsaccades      experience-dependent method      unsupervised method      multiple- indexes analysis     
Corresponding Authors: ZHANG Yang, E-mail: yzhangpsy@suda.edu.cn ZHANG Ming, E-mail: psyzm@suda.edu.cn    
Issue Date: 15 January 2017
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ZHANG Yang
LI Aisu
ZHANG Shaojie
ZHANG Ming
Cite this article:   
ZHANG Yang,LI Aisu,ZHANG Shaojie, et al. Detection methods of microsaccades[J]. Advances in Psychological Science, 2017, 25(1): 29-36.
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http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/10.3724/SP.J.1042.2017.00029     OR     http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/Y2017/V25/I1/29
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