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Advances in Psychological Science    2015, Vol. 23 Issue (5) : 836-848     DOI: 10.3724/SP.J.1042.2015.00836
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The Evolved Ovulation Cycle: Fluctuating Reproduction Motivation and Behavior
CHEN Rui; ZHENG Yuhuang
(School of Economics and Management, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China)
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Abstract  

The evolutional psychology theory suggests that women’s psychology and behavior fluctuate with their menstrual cycle, due to the fluctuating reproduction motives activated by the brief chance of conception. The conception chance accompanied by ovulation boosts women’s sexual desire, causingthem to seek and attract mates. In order to make sure the offspring inherits good genes, women prefer men with characteristics of good genes; meanwhile, women would be more likely to use self-protection behavior to protect their offspring from staining by bad genes. Further, the ovulation cues can affect men’s motivation and behavior as well. Future research should explore other motivations and behaviors caused by ovulation, such as the competitive motivation among females and consumer behavior, to enhance practical implications.

Keywords evolution psychology      reproduction motive      menstrualcycle      ovulation phase      luteal phase     
Corresponding Authors: ZHENG Yuhuang, E-mail: zhengyh@sem.tsinghua.edu.cn   
Issue Date: 15 May 2015
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Cite this article:   
CHEN Rui,ZHENG Yuhuang. The Evolved Ovulation Cycle: Fluctuating Reproduction Motivation and Behavior[J]. Advances in Psychological Science, 2015, 23(5): 836-848.
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http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/10.3724/SP.J.1042.2015.00836     OR     http://journal.psych.ac.cn/xlkxjz/EN/Y2015/V23/I5/836
[1] ZHUANG Jinying; WANG Jiaxi. The Relationship Between Menstrual Cycles and Women’s Ornamental Behavior[J]. Advances in Psychological Science, 2015, 23(5): 729-736.
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